Google quietly announced this week that it would no longer support its RSS platform, Google Reader. Some people are already eulogizing, but others are saying good riddance:

There is a pretty sizable pocket of people like us who are upset at Reader’s demise, but since none of us could ever explain what RSS was – why someone should use Google Reader and how to advance a boringly old technology – it’s dying. Nobody cares that Google Reader is dying, because nobody cared enough to keep it alive. The funny thing about technology is that apps and sites pick up traction after early adopters get to it first. It’s these geeks that brought apps like Instagram to the masses, calling it fantastic and amazing.
With Tumblr, reddit, and the ever-evolving Facebook, internet users can build their personal portals to the world in far easier, shareable, and visually compelling ways than Google's design.

Of course, we've been through enough waves of the internet that it should be apparent that not every hub of information becomes permanent. Just ask the News Corp. proprietors of Myspace, the Friendster programming team, Compuserve, or operators of all the old Angelfire and Geocities webpages.

Clearly, more important things have happened in the past week. But this one will make it that much more of a hassle for internet curiosity curators (such as yours truly) to sort out the SEO-friendly drivel from the proverbial gold.

Meanwhile, here are all the potential crowdsourced replacements. You're welcome.