Plenty has been said about Trump's televised theatrics and addiction to cable news, to the point where critics can track which particular news segment aired right before a corresponding tweet of his.

What struck me about his recent condemnation of Assad over reports of a chemical weapons attack on a town in the Syria's Idlib province is the visually potent way he described what he surely saw footage of beforehand:
Yesterday's chemical attack, a chemical attack that was so horrific in Syria against innocent people, including women, small children and even beautiful little babies, their deaths were an affront to humanity.
Some have also called out his about-face on Assad, criticizing it as incoherent signalling to confused allies (and enemies). Even Russia has openly demanded that Trump say what exactly he'd do in response.

But as we've repeatedly learned over these first three months of his presidency, Trump is a man of impulsive reaction, regardless of long-term strategy.

The lesson we should all take away? Powerful visual stories shape our president's knee-jerk perspective.

Until the next story comes along.

By chance, a young, pretty celebrity falls for a charming, politically-conscious young man amid the modern cacophony of consumer culture, pop music, and a galvanized Left.

Pepsi's now-retracted Kendall Jenner advertisement?

Or the plot of Jean-Luc Godard's 1966 film, Masculin, FĂ©minin?



Also a plausible synopsis of this album ad music video from The Chemical Brothers: